Did the Romans Know the Empire Was Falling?

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Kings and Generals’ historical animated documentary series on medieval history and the history of Rome continues with an episode on how the Fall of the Western Roman Empire was seen by the citizens of the empire. Did the Romans know that the Empire is falling?

Medieval Battles:
Roman History:
Rise of the Vandals:
Marcus Aurelius:
Aurelian:
Commodus:
Claudius:
Sejanus:
Milvian Bridge:
Origins of the Germanic Tribes:
Julian and battle of Strasbourg:
Arminius:
Cimbrian War:
Teutoburg:
How the Fall of Rome Transformed the Mediterranean:

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The video was made by Lucas Salatiel, while the script was researched and written by Johan Melhus. Narration by Officially Devin (

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Production Music courtesy of Epidemic Sound:

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Comment (26)

  1. I thought about it, and I think I know why the Western Roman Empire fell. It just didn't have that sigma male grindset.

  2. It’s a myth to say it the Empire completely fall, Roman Empire still lives on still to this day. We are not called “Romans” we are called Catholics and over a Billion people on earth look to Rome for guidance.

  3. The whole problem is that Rome never really died. It just slowly faded and different regions just slowly moved away from the idea of being part of a central empire.

  4. I learned early on, one simple but highly effective rule of map making: Do not colour land blue on map. That's for water.

  5. A.I GETS ON MY NERVES it's like spying
    I said " rise & Fall of Ancient empire out LOUD offline & this shows up right after
    It happens all the time
    Protest on that

  6. In the fictional tale of “I Claudius,” I will never forget the patrician woman whose daughter was seduced into conspiring with Sejanus to overthrow the Senate — after Sejanus was vanquished, she seals her daughter into her bedroom and as her own punishment sits at the door to listen to the dying screams of her daughter.

  7. christianity was definitely a big part of why roman empire fell, they strayed far from their militaristic roots where keeping up with training, logistics and discipline and fighting strategies was important. By the time the empire split, everyone one else caught up with them and knew how to destroy them already.

  8. I am very shocked that Isidore of Seville hasn’t been mentioned on this video when relating to the different sources describing the germanic people taking over on different parts of the Western Empire.
    I have the sensation that English speaking youtube historical channels keep constantly “forgetting” iberian participation in Europe’s development other than the 15th-16th centuries.
    Not sure why and I wish to be wrong.

  9. Modern people are highly brainwashed and uninformed. Especially the educated / professional class. Exhibit A: Fauxdemic

  10. Another thing to mention would be that calling Romulus a ''Roman'' and Odoacer a ''Barbarian'' is actually simplistic and debatable. Odoacer's ancestors actually lived in the Roman empire for 3 generations, he spoke latin, he was wearing roman clothes and was actually a roman general. On the other end, Romulus was born in Panonia (today's Austria), from a germanic romanised familly who also actually served under Attila for some time. This is another layer of complexity to consider over this whole situation.

  11. don't you think the fell of roman as a whole, was due to Christianity? which was adopted by the Empire so that the God of March no longer helped the legions in every battle.

    that's the simplest theory may could illuminate your brain…and the chritianity caused them fellin to the dark ages until the 15th century

    and they can only develop their new life after leaving the Christian system in the renaissance era

  12. It’s unfortunate that uneducated, barbaric and uncivil people led the the eventual fall of Western Rome. Luckily now, our civilisation is well educated, and disciplined. The barbarians earned nothing and got nothing by destroying an empire. They might have actually benefited by working together other than causing destruction. Barbarians knew no better than to kill each other. Aeterna Roma!

  13. We kinda know modern econometric grid is falling. Am sure the Romans knew it too. But like us, they decided to drown their woes in entertainment rather than try to fix civilization issues.

  14. Yeah, Theodoric's reign, though under the Ostrogothic Germanic kingdom, still upheld much of the old culture and institutions of the late Roman empire (Theodoric himself was somewhat culturally Romanized to begin with anyway). I'd say it wasn't really till the Lombards came in the late 500s that that culture really started to decline and change into the medieval form of Italy (also with Charlemagne later taking over in the 8th century). The East Romans or "Byzantines" still maintained control of the central parts of Italy around Rome and the Papal States, as well as the south and the islands, although they weren't always well-received by the locals and the Gothic War cost much lives and caused widespread destruction. Eventually Italy fractured into a patchwork of dukedoms and such. It was a slow, gradual process of transformation that many of the people at the time probably weren't fully aware of.

  15. Never knew the eastern roman empire reconquered Italy, nothern Africa and even parts of south Iberia. Really interesting to see they really put up a fight towards the west.

  16. If a precise date had to be chosen as the end date of the Western Roman Empire, it should definitely be 410. This year, Rome was sacked for the first time since 395 BC, which is a much greater sign of its decline than the deposition of an Emperor who didn't really rule by itself anyway.

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